Poppy Seed Scone with Rasberry Jelly & Buttermilk Curd

These yummy and easy to make (!) poppy seed scones are a recent discovery. I promised to share the recipe, so here it is!

Dutch readers can look up the original. Note that I used raspberry jelly instead of strawberry; Mr Gnoe and I actually liked that better because of it’s subtle (& less sweet) taste. For this blogpost I made a double batch; you can view the baking process on Flickr.

Please use organic dairy for animal welfare?!

Ingredients for Poppy Seed Scones

Here’s what you need for approx. 18 small scones.

  • 300 gr self-raising flower
  • 4 tbs sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 50 gr butter
  • 100-150 ml buttermilk
  • 1 egg, whisked loose (not two eggs; I made a mistake taking the picture above)
  • 2 tbs poppy seeds
  • (flour)

Preparation

  • Preheat oven at 225 ºC.
  • Mix self-raising flour, sugar and salt in a bowl.
  • Rub the butter into the flour using your fingertips to make a crumbly dough.
  • Pour in the whisked egg and part of the buttermilk. Be careful not to make the dough to wet (that’s why you won’t want to pour in all the buttermilk at once) and make sure you leave a little milk for a golden finishing.
  • Add poppyseed.
  • Knead into a smooth (elastic) dough. If it is too wet you can add a bit more self-raising flour.
  • Flatten dough by hand on a floured surface, until about 2 cm thick.
  • Use a small glass our cookie cutter to cut out circles of approx. 4 cm and put these on your baking sheet.
  • Coat with a little buttermilk to give them a golden shine.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes.

The process of baking Poppy Seed Scones

These poppy seed scones can be eaten either cold or lukewarm and they make great picnic food, bento stuffing, or an addition to your breakfast, lunch or high tea. Serve with mascarpone or clotted cream and jam.

Another one of Gnoe’s tips
Now what to do with the rest of that whole liter of buttermilk? Yes, of course I could drink it, but I do not particularly like buttermilk :\ So I made curd out of it by hanging it in a (clean) moist tea towel from the kitchen cupboard for 8-12 hours.

Buttermilk curd is a bit thicker than quark and much more creamy. Yesh, I like :) The best part is that you can put the curd on your scones instead of mascarpone or clotted cream. A healthier alternative, although I like to indulge on the bad ones ;)

ENJOY!

Poppy seed scone

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