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Today’s bento is completely vegan. Delicious and wholesome; my usual hunger attack around four o’clock went by without any tummy grumbling — and no snacking at all ;)

Full Colour Fall Colours Bento #121, 10-11-2010

Upper tier
Mediterranean chickpea salad with shallots, pine-nuts, garlic, sun-dried tomatoes and black olive topping on a bed of red Batavia lettuce; mini plum tomatoes and gherkin.

Lower tier
Stir-fried cabbages & leek with peanut sauce & celery, mandarin wedges and cucumber-mint flower.

Side container
Elstar apple dressed with lemon juice and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

The garbanzos, pine-nuts and peanut sauce in this bento provided me with plenty of proteins :)

Local & organic: apple, leek, celery, Savoy & white cabbage, lettuce, shallots
Organic: cucumber, peanut butter, mint, cilantro, chickpeas, olives, garlic

Bento Lunch
Find more Wednesday bento lunches at Shannon’s What’s for Lunch Wednesday (week 24)!

Poppy Seed Scone with Rasberry Jelly & Buttermilk Curd

These yummy and easy to make (!) poppy seed scones are a recent discovery. I promised to share the recipe, so here it is!

Dutch readers can look up the original. Note that I used raspberry jelly instead of strawberry; Mr Gnoe and I actually liked that better because of it’s subtle (& less sweet) taste. For this blogpost I made a double batch; you can view the baking process on Flickr.

Please use organic dairy for animal welfare?!

Ingredients for Poppy Seed Scones

Here’s what you need for approx. 18 small scones.

  • 300 gr self-raising flower
  • 4 tbs sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 50 gr butter
  • 100-150 ml buttermilk
  • 1 egg, whisked loose (not two eggs; I made a mistake taking the picture above)
  • 2 tbs poppy seeds
  • (flour)

Preparation

  • Preheat oven at 225 ºC.
  • Mix self-raising flour, sugar and salt in a bowl.
  • Rub the butter into the flour using your fingertips to make a crumbly dough.
  • Pour in the whisked egg and part of the buttermilk. Be careful not to make the dough to wet (that’s why you won’t want to pour in all the buttermilk at once) and make sure you leave a little milk for a golden finishing.
  • Add poppyseed.
  • Knead into a smooth (elastic) dough. If it is too wet you can add a bit more self-raising flour.
  • Flatten dough by hand on a floured surface, until about 2 cm thick.
  • Use a small glass our cookie cutter to cut out circles of approx. 4 cm and put these on your baking sheet.
  • Coat with a little buttermilk to give them a golden shine.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes.

The process of baking Poppy Seed Scones

These poppy seed scones can be eaten either cold or lukewarm and they make great picnic food, bento stuffing, or an addition to your breakfast, lunch or high tea. Serve with mascarpone or clotted cream and jam.

Another one of Gnoe’s tips
Now what to do with the rest of that whole liter of buttermilk? Yes, of course I could drink it, but I do not particularly like buttermilk :\ So I made curd out of it by hanging it in a (clean) moist tea towel from the kitchen cupboard for 8-12 hours.

Buttermilk curd is a bit thicker than quark and much more creamy. Yesh, I like :) The best part is that you can put the curd on your scones instead of mascarpone or clotted cream. A healthier alternative, although I like to indulge on the bad ones ;)

ENJOY!

Poppy seed scone

Why don’t you join Beth Fish’s weekend cooking with a food-related post?

Beth Fish Weekend Cooking logo

Het halve Turks brood rende hard weg :\ toen ik als zondagse lunch een pizzaboterham wilde maken (een van mijn all time favourite foods, daarover zal ik nog eens een blogje schrijven), dus heb ik mijn toevlucht gezocht tot andere restjes in de koelkast die op moesten. En zo kwam ik tot een heerlijke zondagse lunch: mosterdsoep met tuinkers, geroosterde witte boterhammen en frittata van gebakken aardappel, prei en boerenkaas met gerookt paprikapoeder. Yummy, dat smaakte prima :) En weer een hoop ruimte gecreëerd in de koelkast. Nu ga ik gauw nieuwe tuinkers zaaien.

tuinkers

Maar ik voel me toch geroepen ook nog even wat melden over mijn hamsterrace... Ik heb mijzelf uitgedaagd iedere maand minstens 2 dingen te gebruiken uit mijn voorraad Unidentified Cooking Objects en andere producten die de status van ‘reserve’ nooit te boven schijnen te komen. Dat ging prima in maart: ik gebruikte 7 producten en maakte er zelfs 3 echt op.

En nu lijk ik lui achterover te zijn gaan hangen… Want in april ben ik niet zo braaf geweest! En nee, mijn voorsprong van maart mag ik niet voor deze maand meetellen ;) Dus heb ik mezelf nog maar eens bij de kladden gegrepen: gisteren at ik gesnipperde nori (zeewier) in mijn noodles en komende week staat er couscous op het programma met ratatouille en (gedroogde) kikkererwten. Dat zijn dan toch de vereiste 2 ingrediënten (1 1/2?) maar zo is het wel heel makkelijk en daarmee ben ik dus niet tevreden..! Gelukkig is de week/maand nog niet om :) Welk ‘kliekje’ uit mijn voorraden zal ik nog eens uit de kast trekken?

Japanese picture in stead of bento #19As the art of bento is quite a visual thing you could argue that a bento that’s not immortalized by camera is no bento at all But if it’s a lunch in bentobox I consider it a bento :) Even though bento #19 was thrown together in a hurry because I was so busy at work and didn’t have much time! I really am proud that I even managed to make a bento! And look at the bright side: its being the first (and up untill now still the only) bento without a picture, makes it a special bento in it’s own way ;)

Bento #19 came to work on August 30th. It contained: some greens with blue cheese dressing as a dip (cherry tomatoes, radishes, cucumber, carrot, red bell pepper), mix of alfafa, leek sprouts and some other red sprouts that I don’t know the name of, a purple babybel and some red dried melon seeds

I had bought those melon seeds in an Asian wholesale house, thinking you could easily break them between your teeth and eat the insides… (like kwatji, the salted melon seeds I know). NOT! They are too hard to break and finally break apart in many, many pieces. Roasting them doesn’t help either… I hope someone knows a solution, otherwise I will have to go and feed them to some rabbits (not really: I’ll just throw them away)!

Gnoe goes ExtraVeganza!

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